Hypersonics – from Shock Waves to Scramjets

Payment
Обучение бесплатное
Certificate
Сертификация платная
Duration
9 месяцев
О курсе

A flow is called hypersonic if the Mach number is greater than 5. This means that the flow speed is more than five times the speed of sound. In air at room temperature, the speed of sound is around 340 m/s, so a Mach 5 flow would have a flow speed of 1.7 km/s or just over 6,000 km/h. When a rocket launches a satellite into earth orbit, when a probe enters the atmosphere of another planet or when an aircraft is propelled by a supersonic combustion ramjet engine (a scramjet), hypersonic flows are encountered. Hypersonics - from Shock Waves to Scramjets introduces the basic concepts associated with flight at speeds greater than Mach 5 and takes students to the stage where they can analyse the performance of a scramjet engine that might be used in a future access-to-space system.

Программа
Hypersonics – from Shock Waves to Scramjets
Understand flight at speeds greater than Mach 5 and discover how to analyse the performance of a scramjet.
Что Вы изучите?
  • When compressible flow occurs, how it behaves and when a flow becomes hypersonic
  • How to model 1D compressible flows
  • The nature of shock waves
  • The effects on a flow when the flow is hypersonic
  • How scramjet propulsion fits within context of aerospace propulsion
  • How to model the performance of a simple 2D scramjet engine
Лекторы
Professor David J. Mee
Professor David J. Mee
School of Mechanical and Mining Engineering The University of Queensland
David Mee is a Professor in the Centre for Hypersonics in the School of Mechanical and Mining Engineering at The University of Queensland. David has conducted research into hypersonics aerodynamics and has taught courses on fluid mechanics and aerospace propulsion for more than 20 years. In the 1990s he was a member of the UQ team that demonstrated for the first time that a scramjet engine could produce more thrust than drag. His current research interests include reducing the drag in scramjet combustors and investigating the process of transition from laminar to turbulent flow at hypersonic speeds.
Professor Richard G. Morgan
Professor Richard G. Morgan
School of Mechanical and Mining Engineering The University of Queensland
Richard Morgan has been the Director of the Centre for Hypersonics at The University of Queensland since its inception in 1997. He developed the superorbital expansion tube concept that enables flows at speeds of up to 50,000 km/h to be generated. Richard is an expert in modelling and testing the influences of radiation of the hot flows that occur in the bow waves of vehicles entering the atmospheres of the earth, other planets and moons.
Professor Michael Smart
Professor Michael Smart
School of Mechanical and Mining Engineering The University of Queensland
Michael Smart graduated with a Bachelor of Mechanical Engineering from The University of Queensland (UQ) in 1985 and received a PhD from Polytechnic University, Brooklyn, New York in 1995. He then spent 10 years as a research scientist in the Hypersonic Airbreathing Propulsion Branch at NASA’s Langley Research Center, before returning to UQ in 2005. In 2007 he was appointed Professor and Chair of Hypersonic Propulsion. As head of UQ’s HyShot Group, he conducts scramjet flowpath related research, with particular emphasis on flight applications.
Associate Professor Vincent Wheatley
Associate Professor Vincent Wheatley
School of Mechanical and Mining Engineering The University of Queensland
Vincent Wheatley is an Associate Professor in Mechanical Engineering at The University of Queensland. His research expertise is in the modelling and simulation of gas and plasma flows. He is currently investigating mixing and combustion enhancement in scramjets and manipulating shock driven magnetohydrodynamic flows with magnetic fields. Vincent has taught advanced fluid mechanics and aerospace propulsion at UQ for the past four years. He received his BE and MEngSc from UQ and his PhD in Aeronautics from Caltech. He is currently an Australian Research Council Discovery Early-Career Researcher Award fellow.
Dr Anand Veeraragavan
Dr Anand Veeraragavan
School of Mechanical and Mining Engineering The University of Queensland
Anand Veeraragavan is a Senior Lecturer in Mechanical Engineering at The University of Queensland and conducts research in the Centre for Hypersonics. Anand holds a B.Tech (aerospace engineering) from IIT-Madras and MS/PhD degrees in aerospace engineering from the University of Maryland. After his time as a postdoctoral associate in the Device Research Lab at MIT, he worked as a combustion technologist for GE Energy in the US. His research interests span a wide range from renewable energy systems for power generation through to advances in combustion science for air breathing propulsion.
Платформа
EdX
Эта платформа предоставляет все курсы бесплатно. Авторами выступают топовые университеты и корпорации, которые стараются удерживать стандарты качества. За несоблюдение дедлайнов, невыполнение домашнего задания студенты теряют баллы. Как и в других платформах, лекционные видео чередуются с практическими заданиями. Обучение проводится на английском, китайском, испанском, французском и хинди.